Tuesday, March 6, 2018

#502 Butch Hobson and Jim Lefebvre

About the Front: Jim Lefebvre looks like he's been practicing his manager's scowl in the mirror.
About the Back: The Cubs hired Lefebvre prior to the 1992 season. No manager had lasted for as many as four full seasons on the North Side of Chicago since Leo Durocher (1966-1972). Unfortunately for Jim, he could not break the cycle; he was let go at the end of 1993 after guiding the Cubs to an 84-78 record and their fourth straight fourth-place finish.
Triple Play:

1. Butch Hobson played parts of eight seasons in the majors (1975-1982), primarily with the Red Sox. In 1977 he batted .265/.300/.489 with 30 homers and 112 RBI. He also led the league with an astounding 162 strikeouts against just 27 walks. His three-year managerial stint in Boston resulted in a 207-232 record. He managed the Phillies' AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre club for just 27 games in 1996 before an arrest for cocaine possession caused his termination. He did not get another managing job until 1999, but has been at the helm of various minor league teams ever since, including 15 years in the independent Atlantic League.

2. Hobson's birth name is Clell Lavern Hobson, so...Butch works.

3. Jim Lefebvre spent his entire eight-year playing career with the Dodgers, and was the 1965 National League Rookie of the Year on the strength of a .250/.337/.369 batting line with 12 home runs and 69 RBI. He also made the All-Star team in 1966 with career highs of 24 homers, 74 RBI, and a .793 OPS (126 OPS+). Jim finished his playing career with a four-year stint in Japan with the Lotte Orions. He went on to manage the Mariners (1989-1991), Cubs (1992-1993), and the Brewers (1999), finishing with an overall record of 417-442. He's also managed the Chinese national team in several international competitions, including the 2006 World Baseball Classic and 2008 Summer Olympics.

11-Year-Old Kevin Says: Butch Hobson was a native of Alabama. Sometime around 1993, I had to do a social studies class report on Alabama (we all chose numbers at random and were assigned a U.S. state). One of the only things that truly caught my interest in compiling the report was that both Hank Aaron and Willie Mays were from Alabama.

On This Date in 1993: March 6. President Bill Clinton was on the cover of the week's issue of TIME Magazine.

4 comments:

  1. These manager cards were so weird.

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  2. Is there any rhyme or reason for the pairings, other than one NL and one AL manager?

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  3. Rob - Agreed. I think they were doubling up to shoehorn in all of the Marlins and Rockies cards in Series Two.

    Andy - Yeah, they're in alphabetical order by city, one each of AL and NL.

    ReplyDelete